Publications & Reports

Surgical resection of chest wall sarcomas: an analysis of survival and predictors of outcome at an Australian multidisciplinary sarcoma service.

Thakur S, Choong E, Balasooriya A, Spelman T, Wright G, Choong P
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chest wall sarcomas are a rare group of tumours. Surgical resection is considered the mainstay of curative treatment, however, resection and reconstruction of chest wall defects presents complex issues for the clinician. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 59 patients undergoing surgical management of chest wall sarcoma between December 1996 and July 2020 was conducted across a multidisciplinary sarcoma service in Melbourne, Australia. Patient demographics, pathologic data, and long-term outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: Mean age at surgery was 48.4 years (SD 18.3), and 66.1% were male. Median follow-up was 29 months (IQR 11.8, 51.0 months). Fifty-one patients presented with primary tumours, while the others had secondary tumours resected. Most tumours arose in bone (72.9%) as opposed to soft tissues (27.1%). Chondrosarcoma was the most common histologic subtype (50.8%). The most common reconstructive techniques involved the use of mesh (79.7%) or mesh supplemented with bone cement (33.9%). Overall survival at 1 and 5 years was 92% and 70%, respectively. Seven patients died of metastatic sarcoma during the follow up period with a median survival time of 27 months. Twelve patients had evidence of disease recurrence during the follow-up period. Stage 4 disease, soft tissue tumours, secondary tumours, leiomyosarcoma and UPS subtypes, and plating reconstruction were associated with increased disease recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that outcomes for chest wall sarcoma are similar to extremity sarcomas and may be treated in a similar manner. Patients requiring adjuvant radiotherapy and those who develop disease-recurrence are more likely to have worse overall survival outcome despite complete surgical resection.

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Publication

  • Journal: ANZ Journal of Surgery
  • Published: 11/07/2022
  • Volume: Epub ahead of print

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