Publications & Reports

Standardised shorter regimens versus individualised longer regimens for multidrug-resistant TB.

Abidi S, Achar J, Neino MMA, Bang D, Benedetti A, Brode S, Campbell JR, Casas E, Conradie F, Dravniece G, du Cros P, Falzon D, Jaramillo E, Kuaban C, Lan Z, Lange C, Li PZ, Makhmudova M, Maug AKJ, Menzies D, Migliori GB, Miller A, Myrzaliev B, Ndjeka N, Noeske J, Parpieva N, Piubello A, Schwoebel V, Sikhondze W, Singla R, Souleymane MB, Trébucq A, Van Deun A, Viney K, Weyer K, Zhang BJ, Khan FA
McGill International TB Centre, Montreal, Canada.

Abstract

We sought to compare the effectiveness of two WHO-recommended regimens for the treatment of rifampin- or multidrug-resistant (RR/MDR) tuberculosis: a standardised regimen of 9-12 months (the “shorter regimen”), and individualised regimens of >/=20 months (“longer regimens”).We collected individual patient data from observational studies identified through systematic reviews and a public call for data. We included patients meeting WHO eligibility criteria for the shorter regimen: not previously treated with second-line drugs, and with fluoroquinolone- and second-line injectable agent-susceptible RR/MDR tuberculosis. We used propensity score matched, mixed-effects meta-regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios and adjusted risk differences (aRD) for failure or relapse, death within 12 months of treatment initiation, and loss to follow-up.We included 2625/3378 (77.7%) individuals from 9 studies of shorter regimens, and 2717/13104 (20.7%) from 53 studies of longer regimens. Treatment success was higher with the shorter regimen than with longer regimens (pooled proportions: 80.0% versus 75.3%), due to less loss to follow-up with the former (aRD, -0.15 95%CI: -0.17 to -0.12). The risk difference for failure or relapse was slightly higher with the shorter regimen overall (0.02, 95%CI: 0 to 0.05), and greater in magnitude with baseline resistance to pyrazinamide (0.12, 95%CI: 0.07 to 0.16), prothionamide/ethionamide (0.07, 95%CI: -0.01 to 0.16), or ethambutol (0.09, 95%CI: 0.04 to 0.13).In patients meeting WHO criteria for its use, the standardised shorter regimen was associated with substantially less loss to follow-up during treatment as compared to individualised longer regimens, and with more failure/relapse in the presence of resistance to component medications. Our findings support the need to improve access to reliable drug susceptibility testing.

Link to publisher’s web site

Publication

  • Journal: The European Respiratory Journal
  • Published: 01/01/2020
  • Volume: Epub ahead of print

Author