Publications & Reports

Enabling new graduate midwives to work in midwifery continuity of care models: A conceptual model for implementation.

Allison M Cummins, Christine Catling, Caroline S E Homer
Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: High-level evidence demonstrates midwifery continuity of care is beneficial for women and babies. Women have limited access to midwifery continuity of care models in Australia. One of the factors limiting women’s access is recruiting enough midwives to work in continuity. Our research found that newly graduated midwives felt well prepared to work in midwifery led continuity of care models, were well supported to work in the models and the main driver to employing them was a need to staff the models. However limited opportunities exist for new graduate midwives to work in midwifery continuity of care. AIM: The aim of this paper therefore is to describe a conceptual model developed to enable new graduate midwives to work in midwifery continuity of care models. METHOD: The findings from a qualitative study were synthesised with the existing literature to develop a conceptual model that enables new graduate midwives to work in midwifery continuity of care. FINDINGS: The model contains the essential elements to enable new graduate midwives to work in midwifery continuity of care models. DISCUSSION: Each of the essential elements discussed are to assist midwifery managers, educators and new graduates to facilitate the organisational changes required to accommodate new graduates. CONCLUSION: The conceptual model is useful to show maternity services how to enable new graduate midwives to work in midwifery continuity of care models.

Link to publisher’s web site

Publication

  • Journal: Women and birth : journal of the Australian College of Midwives
  • Published: 01/10/2018
  • Volume: 31
  • Issue: 5
  • Pagination: 343-349

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