Publications & Reports

The contribution of church health services to maternal health care provision in Papua New Guinea.

Mapira P, Morgan C
Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health, Melbourne, Australia [email protected]

Abstract

Access to maternal health services is one key to the reduction of maternal mortality in Papua New Guinea. Church health services (CHS) are known to administer around 45% of rural health facilities. We undertook a descriptive analysis based on health facility service provision data for 2009 from the National Health Information System (NHIS), supported by document review and interviews. We recoded NHIS data on facilities by administration by CHS or government health service, judged their capacity for emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and analysed service provision for 2009. For rural services (i.e., outside of provincial capitals), CHS were recorded as providing 58% of health facility childbirth care and 38% of first antenatal visits. Obstetric referral patterns and facility capacity suggested many facilities were likely to have only basic EmOC and limited referral options. Nationally, CHS provided 21% of temporary methods of contraception (measured in couple-year protection) but 85% of referrals for permanent contraception. There was marked variation across provinces with clear implications for where health system strengthening could be beneficial to maternal survival. Our findings also disclosed gaps in the NHIS around monitoring of complicated childbirth and inclusion of community-based care.

Publication

  • Journal: Papua and New Guinea Medical Journal
  • Published: 01/09/2011
  • Volume: 54
  • Issue: 3-4
  • Pagination: 139-146

Author

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