Projects

Characterisation of drug resistance mutations in the HIV reverse transcriptase

We are investigating the role of mutations in the HIV reverse transcriptase that are highly prevalent in viral isolates from drug-treated individuals on drug resistance and virological failure. This includes silent mutations (that do not code for amino acid changes) selected during drug treatment.

Our studies have led to the identification of N348I in the HIV reverse transcriptase connection domain that is prevalent in drug-treated individuals and leads to dual reverse transcriptase inhibitor class resistance.

Outcomes

Tachedjian G and Sluis-Cremer N. Chapter 13. Role of RNase H activity in NRTI/NNRTI Drug Resistance. pp281 – 303. Edited by Stuart LeGrice and Mattias Gotte. In Human Immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase: A bench-to-bedside success. Springer Publishing Company, New York. Published August 2013. ISBN 978-1-4614-7290-2

Publications

2016

2015

2012

2010

2009

2007

Collaborators

  • Nicolas Sluis-Cremer, University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    1. Richard Harrigan, British Columbia Centre of Excellence, Vancouver, Canada
  • Michael Kuiper, VPAC, Melbourne
  • Suzanne Crowe, Centre for Biomedical Research, Burnet Institute

Funding

NHMRC Project Grant 433903. Drug resistance mutations in the connection subdomain of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

NHMRC Project Grant 603704. Silent mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase selected during antiretroviral therapy.

Contact Details

For any general enquiries relating to this project, please contact:

Professor Gilda Tachedjian

Head of Life Sciences; Head of Tachedjian Laboratory (Retroviral Biology and Antivirals)

Telephone

+61392822256

Email

gilda.tachedjian@burnet.edu.au